Workshop with Judith Black — Friday Afternoon

February 25, 2015

POLISHING YOUR STORYTELLING TECHNIQUES

This remarkably fun, completely participatory, workshop invites you to explore your natural skills and offer you a new palette of possibilities for bringing your storytelling fully alive.

Come dressed for movement and play. Leave with a new lexicon of communication skills.

 

About Judith Black

Judith Black, one of America’s foremost storytellers, retells history from new perspectives, tickles familial dysfunction, offers ironic explorations of aging, and most recently has turned her skills towards climate disruption.  As a Wheelock College graduate and former teacher she is able to draw storytelling through the educational landscape, showing its profound uses in cognitive, emotional, and social learning. Her work for adults has been featured twelve times at the National Storytelling Festival and on stages from the Montreal Comedy Festival  to the Art Museum of Cape Town, SA. She is the winner of the Oracle Award, storytelling’s most coveted laurel, and was recently given the Brother Blue and Ruth Hill Award. Locally she originated and ran Bridging Live for 16 years, sings with Calla Lilly, is an active member of the Marblehead Harbor Rotary Club and 350.org. Presently, she is trying to figure out how to live without burning fossil fuels and teaches two classes annually:

www.tellingstoriestochildren.com

http://www.storiesalive.com/MakingStories.html

For more info: www.storiesalive.com

Children’s Concert – Sunday Morning

June 2, 2014

Andy Offutt Erwin will perform the Sunday Children’s Concert in the amphitheater .

With a silly putty voice, hilarious heart-filled stories, and amazing mouth noises (arguably, the greatest whistler in the world) one-person-showman, Andy Offutt Irwin, is equal parts mischievous schoolboy and the Marx Brothers, peppered with a touch of the Southern balladeer. One of the most sought after performing storytellers in the United States, Andy is especially known for relating the adventures of his eighty-five-year-old-widowed-newly-minted-physician-aunt, Marguerite Van Camp, a woman who avoids curmudgeonship by keeping her finger on the pulse of the changing world around her as she seeks to grow – even at her advanced age – in the New South.  Marguerite steps lively through this existence, loving as many people as she can.

October of 2015 marked Andy’s sixth year as a Featured Teller at the National Storytelling Festival. He has appeared ten times as Teller in Residence at International Storytelling Center. Among other gigs, Andy has been a Guest Artist at La Guardia High School of Art, Music, and Performing Arts in New York (The “FAME!” School); he has been a Keynote Speaker/Performer at the Library of Congress-Virburnum Foundation Conference on Family Literacy; a Guest Writer Performer with the Georgia Tech Glee Club; and a guest composer with the Amherst College Men’s Double Quartet.

Andy has held a few almost-real-jobs that include: Artist-In-Residence in Theatre at Emory University’s Oxford College from 1991 to 2007. (He continues serving at Oxford from time-to-time as Artist-in-Just-Passing-Through). A very long time ago Andy spent five years as a performer, writer, and director for SAK Theatre at Walt Disney World.

Andy is the recipient of many awards, but he is tickled as can be to have received the Oracle 2013 Circle of Excellence from the National Storytelling Network.

 

 

 

Open Telling – Sunday Morning

March 1, 2013

First come, first serve! This Sunday morning session is an opportunity for up-and-coming storytellers to reach a seasoned audience with the spice of new stories.

The Stories We Tell – A Workshop with Laura Simms – Friday Afternoon

March 1, 2013

We live in a universe of stories, familiar, heard or hidden. Starting the workshop with a traditional tale as a scaffolding for reflection and learning about how a story functions in its dynamic engagement, we will use images from the tale to jump start a potent personal narrative. The stories of our lives influence how we engage with ourselves and the world. They support and nurture our lives, or become the source of conflict or obstacle. Through the guided process of creating the personal story we can harvest our stories to bring benefit to ourselves and others and turn memory into mythic memoir. Discussion and excavation will illumine the power of telling stories, whether true life or traditional, as a compassionate act that releases us from the burden of opinion or limiting ideas. Everyone is to bring a journal or note paper, and dress casually.

Suggested reading: OUR SECRET TERRITORY: The Essence of Storytelling (sentient books) by Laura Simms. There will be handouts with other readings, a suggested bibliography and worksheets so what we do can be repeated and deepened on one’s own.

Sierra Story Slam – Saturday Afternoon

March 1, 2013

The Sierra Storytelling Festival will hold the hugely popular Story Slam once more this year. It’s your chance to regale the crowd and compete in the art of storytelling for a prize, by telling your own true story that’s in accord with our Slam Theme. It’s a contest of words by talent both known and undiscovered, and anyone over age 18 can tell.

The theme is Precipitation!

You as a slammer will enter the competition by dropping your name in a hat. Twelve names will be drawn.

You’ll have five minutes to tell the tale. Time your tale well. Points are lost if you lapse past the five minutes or go far into the one-minute grace period in wrapping up the story.

There will be a small team of judges, some professional storytellers, some not, made up of audience members.

Judges will make decisions based on these criteria: how well the story is told; how well the story is structured; how well the story explores, connects with, and/or reveals some truth about the theme; and how well the time limit is honored.

True stories are the medium here; poetry is discouraged unless it fits the criteria and tells a story. Folktales, myths or fables are discouraged unless, again, they are worked into the teller’s true story and fit the criteria. Copyright laws apply: Don’t use someone else’s work. Audience and judges expect real life adventures.

Props—including notes—are not to be used.

The winner is the lucky recipient of an All-Festival Pass to next year’s Sierra Storytelling Festival.